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Hello Guest, and welcome to the Quamby Fly Fishers Club web site.


As a guest, you are invited to browse our site and hopefully, enjoy reading our members fishing reports and access Webcam Central complete with local weather reports.

Why not sign up for a free subscription to our club website and expand your experience with some great new features.

sign up todayIt's easy to subscribe:

Simply click  Register - in the Login panel,
giving your email - username and password.
You will receive an email to validate your subscription



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Subscribed members can fully participate on our Members Blog access Games central use our messaging system, start your own Fishing Journal, stay up to date with our club events and become part of our on-line community.

We welcome subscriptions from anglers and angling club members Worldwide.

Subscribers are invited to become fully paid up members of our Fly Fishing Club.

For just $25 a year our members enjoy the full benefits of our website including our growing library of fly fishing tips and tuition, fly tying instructions and much more.

email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more details

Full members have access to our Club Journal which provides a wealth of information. Our catch database can be searched to reveal the best flies to use on any Central North Tasmanian river or lake at any time of year or weather conditions.

The database will be an invaluable fishing aid for our members and club competitors over the coming years

 

If you are planning on visiting Tasmania and intend to do some fly fishing, why not become a full paid member of our club and gain access to the collective local knowledge of our members.

As a full member you are invited to drop in on our club meeting on the first Wednesday of each month, (see About us for details on times and how to get here).

Chat with our members to gain valuable local knowledge and make new friends right here in the heart of Tasmania. It's easy to stay in touch through our chat room, Blog or private messaging.


Free membership for people under 18.

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Welcome to Quamby Fly Fishers Club

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Certain recreational fishing destinations have recieved funding for upgrades. These venues include Little Pine boat ramp, Penstock Lagoon boat ramp, Lake Leake boat ramp and pontoon, and Four Springs Lake web cam.


IMG 2695


Infomation sourced from Tasfish

Last modified on Wednesday, 25 June 2014 19:47
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Didymo is a freshwater algae that can cause massive algal blooms on the beds of streams, rivers and occasionally lake edges where wave action exists. Didymo has recently been identified in the South Island of New Zealand and consequently the potential for translocation to Tasmania is vastly increased. Didymo can adversely affect freshwater fish, plant and invertebrate species by reducing the number of suitable habitats available to these species.


The algae attaches to the streambed by stalks. These stalks can form a thick brown mat that smothers rocks, submerged plants and other aquatic materials. Established mats form flowing streamers that can turn white at their ends and look similar to brown tissue paper. Although the algae appear slimy, it feels like wet tissue paper.


Didymo is made up of diatom cells that cannot be seen with the naked eye until large colonies form. It takes only ONE of these cells to survive and be transported to other water bodies for Didymo to spread. Didymo cells thrive in freshwater and as such, the cleaning of equipment in freshwater helps to keep them alive.

 

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Infomation sourced from Tasmanian Inland Fisheries Service.

 

Continue Reading For Prevention......

Last modified on Wednesday, 25 June 2014 18:36
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In 1864, a ship about to depart England for Australia was asked to take on board a small gift: several hundred brown trout eggs. Those eggs not only survived the 91-day trip to New Norfolk in Tasmania, they later hatched and thrived in Derwent Valley ponds.

                        Salmon roe by Ahef

Article by FIONA BREEN - ABC Landline 

Link To Video Under Read More.

Last modified on Tuesday, 27 May 2014 09:25
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Celebrating 150 Years Short Film.


150 years

 

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Last modified on Sunday, 25 May 2014 01:00
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Last modified on Saturday, 24 May 2014 19:22

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